Blogs

Won’t the real Slim Shady please stand up?

Blog Writer: 
Pranav Yajnik

Although Eminem’s misanthropic anti-everything alter-ego Slim Shady was put to rest a couple of years ago, the problem posed by the above quotation lives on the most unlikely place: the community (if such a fractious, schismatic group of people can even be called that) of kathak dancers.

Raga Yaman with Chandralekha

Blog Writer: 
Ashok Gupta

I am very fortunate to have had as my neighbour and friend, a creative artist and  philosopher, choreographer, dancer, writer, a bundle of energy and a gentle human being, the late Chandralekha. It is extremely rewarding to be in the presence of such people whose energies one cant help but absorb.

Towards a finer grain

Blog Writer: 
Pranav Yajnik

This past year of my Kathak training has brought to me the realisation that it's often the ostensibly simple things that prove the hardest to accomplish, but which are all at once the most effective.

Music venues and audiences

Blog Writer: 
Sanjeevini Dutta

As the Darbar and Alchemy Festivals become memories (with points of intense pleasure) at Dartington Hall in South-West England, the Tagore Festival mounted by Satish Kumar of Resurgence magazine is in full swing. For those who live in the surrounding areas this is a gift: the eminence of the speakers and artists from the likes of poet Andrew Motion, life-style guru Deepak Chopra, writer Amit Chaudhuri and dancer Aditi Mangaldas gather to celebrate the influence that the poet and philosopher Rabindranath Tagore continues to exert over us today.

Thanks to the baijjis

Blog Writer: 
Ashok Gupta

Hindustani Music was not for the masses and only for the elite and the wealthy. ‘baithaks’ were organised and the musicians became court musicians of the rajahs and nawabs, and zamindars where they were well looked after and generously rewarded. It is because of them that the music survived.

The Festivals come like three buses

Blog Writer: 
Sanjeevini Dutta

 

As they say either there is no bus or three come in at the same time. This year the Alchemy Festival of South Asian culture (music, dance, theatre, fashion, literature and debate) at the Southbank Centre, London and Darbar Festival of classical music Hindustani and Carnatic, at the Kings Place, London will overlap over the Easter weekend, forcing audiences to make choices.

Raga Marwa at Sunset

Blog Writer: 
Ashok Gupta

Bade Ghulam Ali Khan Sahib was sitting on Chowpatty beach in Bombay, watching the setting sun. The rays had fanned out and the sky was red, as was the sea reflecting back.

  Lost in thought at this breath-taking spectacle, Khan Sahib mused that the twilight hour was the perfect time to sing Marwa.

Syndicate content